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Find an individual who either played a sport or was a member of a support group. Search by last name by clicking on the first letter of the person's last name.


Mr. Ray D. Jarboe
1964

Home:
3376 Grasmere Dr.
Lexington, Ky 40503

Work:
Home Phone:
Work Phone:
Fax:
Email:
859-223-1988
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rdjarb@aol.com
Ray wrote this Living Memorial for Coach Shipley for the 2001 Shipley Reunion and it will serve as his LM for the Tribute to Coach Shipley. Posted by Dr. Ed Dugas on Oct. 3, 2017.


Ray Jarboe, basketball player,1960-1964.

Married to Diane Rose for 36 years. We have one daughter, Sarah, who is currently in Shanghai, China teaching English at Shanghai International Studies University.

I retired from IBM in 1996 after 32 years of service. All of that time was in Lexington, KY except for 4 years in New Jersey, 1970-1974. I held various middle management positions mostly in Systems Analysts and Materials Management.

We currently live in Lexington but we spend the winter months in Port Charlotte, Fl.

I was recruited by coach Shipley out of Lafayette High School in
Lexington, Ky. I think he thought he had another sleeper like Tim Thompson. Boy, was he fooled.

I did get the opportunity to visit the school prior to committing. It was during spring break of my senior year and was the first of the many adventurous driving trips with Finley Stamatis. You have to be an engineer to pick out the route he did.

I was shocked to find that no one was waiting to greet us. Of course it was 3 a.m. when we arrived so I slept on the floor of Finley's and Tim's room.

Coach Shipley did provide for a hotel room after that... thank goodness. However, I had to share the room with a guy by the name of Dean Church and his friend who had also driven down to visit. We seemed to be able to find some of the more colorful places to visit as I'm sure Dean will recall.

The biggest adjustment was getting use to the food (which I never did) and the language. Being raised in Kentucky on potatoes, I did not appreciate rice 3 meals a day. Then they had the nerve to call some of it "dirty" rice. Who ever heard of eating something dirty? What were those little black specs anyway?

We did have great pre-game meals at home and great post-game meals on the road. I looked forward to those. But what about those sack meals after the home games? Does anyone know what was on those sandwiches?

My first trip to the barbershop was quite an adventure. No one was speaking English and while I was waiting I wondered if I was still in the U.S. I just knew they were talking about me. I also don't think the barber had too much experience cutting a flat top.

I remember the first practice when Andy Russo entered school. Andy, being a high scoring stud out of junior college, had a variety of shots. One of them was a hook shot from the side of the basket about 12-15 feet out which he could hit very well. The first time he shot it in practice, coach had one of his screaming fits and Andy didn't get to shoot that any more. Andy, I think it was a great shot and the only reason coach didn't like it was that he couldn't figure out how to put it into the shuffle offense. Did you teach that to your high school players?

When Rudy Dossett first came to school I didn't have a roommate so he was put in my room. He was recovering from some type of surgery and during the night he would moan. I didn't know whether to go to sleep, afraid of what might happen. Later on Rudy told me that I talked in my sleep so he was just as concerned.

I remember one road trip to play Western Ky coached by Ed Diddle. We had a freshman named Tom Boesch from Chicago. Now Tom was not too serious about anything and always seemed to be in trouble. That night he couldn't miss and I believe he scored 30 points. Coach Diddle was impressed. We still lost the game. Four of my friends had driven from Lexington to the game and had come prepared to have a little party. So after the game I invited several of my teammates to their room concerned that coach would find out.

He didn't show, but later that night after the party, Sam Thomas, Dean
Church, Rudy, myself and some other players were in one room and it was very late.

The door opened and it was coach. You could see his color start to change as he started to yell at us. But after seeing that the whole starting team was there he thought better of it and just said "It's past bedtime" and turned and left. See he did have a heart!

As everyone else, I remember the long, hard practices and the running of many laps. Did that really make us a better team? I'm looking forward to seeing all of my "old" teammates.


Basketball- (M):  1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964


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