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Baseball: Robichaux's Cajuns had 'certain values, certain qualities'

Tim Buckley, The Advertiser, July 8, 2019

Longtime Ragin’ Cajuns play-by-play man Jay Walker may never forget the day Tony Robichaux clinched his first Sun Belt Conference championship.

It was 1997, and Robichaux was late in his third of 25 seasons as head coach at UL.

The Cajuns were on the road in Edinburg, Texas, playing then-Sun Belt member Texas Pan-American, now part of Texas-Rio Grande Valley.

“I went out, and I bought a bottle of champagne, and I brought it to the room where he and (then-assistant coach) Wade Simoneaux were staying,” Walker said. “These were in the days before Coach was able to afford a room by himself.

“And he said, ‘Thank you,’ But he told me later, ‘I hope you don’t mind; I didn’t drink it.’”

Why not?

A devout Catholic, Robichaux — who died Wednesday morning at the age of 57 after having suffered a heart attack June 23 — had a reason.

Related: Legendary UL baseball coach Tony Robichaux dies

More: Cajuns coach Robichaux 'was one of the good guys'

UL radio play-by-play man Jay Walker, left and shown here speaking with athletic director Bryan Maggard, was close with late Ragin' Cajuns baseball coach Tony Robichaux. 

UL radio play-by-play man Jay Walker, left and shown here speaking with athletic director Bryan Maggard, was close with late Ragin' Cajuns baseball coach Tony Robichaux.  (Photo: SCOTT CLAUSE / USATODAY Network)

“He said, ‘I refused to drink champagne at my wedding, because I don’t really like it, and I felt like if I couldn’t drink it at my wedding it would not have been proper for me to drink it this time,’” Walker said. “It was almost like he was saying that we were almost ‘cheating on my wife.’

“But that just went to show you that he lived on principle, and he got his instruction from God, and he set out to fulfill, as best he could — despite the fact he was only a man and had shortcomings — to live his life in a godly manner, and to teach others to do the same.”



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